Use UI Flows in Power Automate to interact with a web site

UI Flows are new features from power platform april 2020 wave, and allow you to integrate local installed applications and web sites. I’ve made a video with UI Flow for web sites. In this demo I’ve create a flow that reads the Bitcoin / Euro rate from a web sites and sends it per Email.

Call an Azure Function from X++ in Dynamics 365 Finance / SCM

Create an Azure Function

Azure Functions are simple way to pack and provide business logic as web service without worrying about hosting a web server. Azure Functions can be implemented in different programming languages like C#, JavaScript, PHP, Java, etc. and can be hosted on Linux and Windows with different runtime environments that feed your need.

In the Azure Portal click + Create a resource and search for Function App:

Create a Azure Function App

In the next screen choose a subscription and create a resource group (or use an existing one if you like). Provide a useful name and choose code as Publish method. Select .NET Core 3.1 as runtime stack and a region that is near your location:

Configure the Azure Function App to use .NET Core 3.1

Click Review + Create to create the Azure Function. It takes a view minutes to provision all the required elements:

Deploy the Azure Function App

Click on Go to Resource. Next to the Functions group click + to create a new function and select In-Portal to edit the function code direct in the browser:

Create a new HTTP trigger

Choose the webhook + API to create a demo function that can be called via HTTP POST.

Use webhook for the Azure Function

This will create a function that takes a name as parameter and returns “Hello ” + the parameter name.

C# Azure Function code

You can test the function by using Test tab on the right. The function takes a JSON string with a name parameter and returns a simple string.

Test the Azure Function with a JSON string

Call the function from X++

In the azure portal get the function URL with a function key. Copy the URL with the key:

Copy the Azure Function URL with function key

In Visual Studio create an X++ class with a main method for testing. Use the System.Net.Http.HttpClient class to call the service. The content is a JSON string encoded in UTF-8 with a name parameter and value. In this example the name is Dynamics:

System.Net.Http.HttpClient httpClient = new System.Net.Http.HttpClient();
System.Net.Http.HttpContent content = new System.Net.Http.StringContent(
        "{\"name\":\"Dynamics\"}",
        System.Text.Encoding::UTF8,
        "application/json");

At the moment X++ does not support the await keyword for asynchronouse calls. The workaround is to use the Task.Wait() method. Call the service with your function URL async and get the content of the call:

var task = httpClient.PostAsync("https://<YOUR_FUNCTION_URL>",content);
task.Wait();
System.Net.Http.HttpResponseMessage msg = task.Result;

System.Net.Http.HttpContent ct = msg.Content;
var result = ct.ReadAsStringAsync();
result.Wait();
System.String s = result.Result;

info(s);

Start the class from Visual Studio. The result should look like this:

Call the Azure Function from Dynamics 365 Finance

Connect to the SQL database of a Dynamics 365 Finance Test instance

In Dynamics 365 Finance / SCM we can no longer access the SQL database of the production environment directly. However, we can access the SQL database of the Acceptance Test instance. All required information can be found in LCS. I’ve made a video where to find this information in LCS and how to connecto to the SQL database.

Using SQL DDL Triggers to restore read Permissions programatically after Dynamics AX 2009 Synchronization

Recently, a customer using Dynamics AX 2009 implemeted a web service that access a view directly in SQL Server. Therefore they created a new SQL user login and gave the user read permissions on the view.

Read permission on a view

However, when synchronizing the data dictionary in Dynamics AX 2009, the views are droped and recreated and the permission on the object is lost. Therfore the webservice call fails.

One way to address this issue from a SQL perspective is to create a DDL trigger that sets the permissions on the view programmatically. Here is a small SQL script that sets read permissions for the user view_user on the the DIRPARTYVIEW after the view has been created again.

CREATE TRIGGER [VIEW_PERMISSION] 
ON DATABASE 
    FOR CREATE_VIEW
AS 
BEGIN
    DECLARE @name SYSNAME
    SELECT  @name = EVENTDATA().value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/ObjectName)[1]','SYSNAME')

    if @name = 'DIRPARTYVIEW' begin
        GRANT SELECT ON [dbo].[DIRPARTYVIEW] TO [view_user]
    end
END
GO

ENABLE TRIGGER [VIEW_PERMISSION] ON DATABASE
GO

Dynamics 365 FO: Export Entity Store to Azure Data Lake

Since version 10 Dynamics 365 for Finance and Operations supports the entity store export to Azure data lake. The main benefits are reduced costs because Azure Cloud storage is cheap and easy access for Business Intelligence tools like PowerBI.

If you are running a local development VM, the data connection tab in system parameters ist deactived by default. However, this can be actived using the SysFlighting table.

The configuration is pretty well documented by Microsoft. I’ve performed all the necessary steps and recorded a video:

Connect Azure Data Lake Storage with PowerBI dataflow

PowerBI dataflow performs ETL (Extract Transform Load) workloads in the cloud. PowerBI Pro and Premium Users get dataflow storage without additional charges. However, this storage is managed by PowerBI and you cannot access it directly. Therefor BYOSA (Bring Your Own Storage Account) is support to connect you own Azure storage account with PowerBI dataflow. I’ve made a video, following the documentation, how to connect an Azure storage account with PowerBI. Please find my video youtube:

Configure Azure Data Lake storage with PowerBI dataflow

Configure PowerBI on Dynamics 365 FO developer VM

I’ve created a video tutorial how to configure PowerBI on a stand alone Dynamics 365 Finance and Operations developer VM